Reggie Gaskins


 

 

We Love To Read

One Crazy Summer (Ala Notable Children's Books. Middle Readers Book 1)

by Rita Williams-Garcia

In this Newbery Honor novel, New York Times bestselling author Rita Williams-Garcia tells the story of three sisters who travel to Oakland, California, in 1968 to meet the mother who abandoned them.

Eleven-year-old Delphine is like a mother to her two younger sisters, Vonetta and Fern. She's had to be, ever since their mother, Cecile, left them seven years ago for a radical new life in California. When they arrive from Brooklyn to spend the summer with her, Cecile is nothing like they imagined. While the girls hope to go to Disneyland and meet Tinker Bell, their mother sends them to a day camp run by the Black Panthers. Unexpectedly, Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern learn much about their family, their country, and themselves during one truly crazy summer.

This moving, funny novel won the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction and the Coretta Scott King Award and was a National Book Award Finalist.

Readers who enjoy Christopher Paul Curtis's The Watsons Go to Birmingham will find much to love in One Crazy Summer. Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern's story continues in P.S. Be Eleven.

Passionwalk: Don't Let Your Blessing Slip Away

by S. L. Plummer

Insatiable but inexperienced, Saundra is at a crossroads. Devastated by her last relationship, she’s torn by the impulses of her own body. A voluptuous, bisexual, black Christian beauty, she has quit praying for her soul mate to find her. Like Saundra, Nehemiah’s battered heart, betrayed by his ex-wife, has abandoned hope that the woman his great-aunt prophesied will find him. If he can trust God to deliver her, can she be the dream he had left in his childhood? Their first date is one of discovery. Despite their Christian vows, they share a strong sexual appetite. “Forgive us, God,” they pray as foreplay gets heated. Eventually forsaking celibacy, they learn to trust the connection that leads to a passionate journey. Together, they face cultural tensions that break open moral contradictions in their sexual playground. Nehemiah admits to his past infidelity but is shaken by Saundra’s silence about her own history. Can they trust each other, or will history repeat itself?

 

Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority

by Tom Burrell

“Black people are not dark-skinned white people,” says advertising visionary Tom Burrell. In fact, they are a lot more. They are survivors of the Middle Passage and centuries of humiliation and deprivation, who have excelled against the odds, constantly making a way out of “no way!” At this point in history, the idea of black inferiority should have had a “Going-Out-of-Business Sale.” After all, Barack Obama has reached the Promised Land.

Yet, as Brainwashed: Erasing the Myth of Black Inferiority testifies, too much of black America is still wandering in the wilderness. In this powerful examination of “the greatest propaganda campaign of all time”—the masterful marketing of black inferiority—Burrell poses 10 provocative questions that will make black people look in the mirror and ask why, nearly 150 years after the Emancipation Proclamation, so many blacks still think like slaves.

Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present Reprint Edition

by Harriet A. Washington

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. This groundbreaking study documents that the infamous Tuskegee experiments, in which black syphilitic men were studied but not treated, was simply the most publicized in a long, and continuing, history of the American medical establishment using African-Americans as unwitting or unwilling human guinea pigs. Washington, a journalist and bioethicist who has worked at Harvard Medical School and Tuskegee University, has accumulated a wealth of documentation, beginning with Thomas Jefferson exposing hundreds of slaves to an untried smallpox vaccine before using it on whites, to the 1990s, when the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University ran drug experiments on African-American and black Dominican boys to determine a genetic predisposition for "disruptive behavior." Washington is a great storyteller, and in addition to giving us an abundance of information on "scientific racism," the book, even at its most distressing, is compulsively readable. It covers a wide range of topics—the history of hospitals not charging black patients so that, after death, their bodies could be used for anatomy classes; the exhaustive research done on black prisoners throughout the 20th century—and paints a powerful and disturbing portrait of medicine, race, sex and the abuse of power. (Dec. 26)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

 

 





 

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